Narrowsburg news

Tidings of comfort and joy

By Greg Triggs
Posted 12/2/20

Narrowsburg can be such an idyllic place year-round, but especially during the holidays. An iconic bridge bisecting the graceful bend of our snowy river, twinkling lights, a beautiful tree, friendly …

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Narrowsburg news

Tidings of comfort and joy

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Narrowsburg can be such an idyllic place year-round, but especially during the holidays. An iconic bridge bisecting the graceful bend of our snowy river, twinkling lights, a beautiful tree, friendly shopkeepers, devoted town servants and a proud community all moving through what feels like a scene Currier and Ives didn’t get around to creating.

Yet, the larger world is still crazy and impossible to escape. Pandemic, politics, the Kardashians—they attack us on all fronts, flinging us into the bigger world without slowing down. Indeed, the modern world seems to get more intense each day, without taking time off for the holidays. 

Where does one go for a little hope and cheer during these troubled times?

Perhaps the answer is in our own backyard where the holiday spirit seems to endure and thrive.

Three local angels—Barbara Elco, Pat Hawker and Judy Mohn—don’t just talk about being charitable, they put their money where their talented fingers are. This trio recently made 60, yes 60, cotton patchwork quilts and donated them to the food pantry at Saint Francis Xavier Church, 151 Bridge St. Their careful needlework with felt backings will certainly make for a cozier Christmas for local families in need. (See story on page 1.)

Please note, there is no need to be a member of the church to participate in the food pantry, which is ecumenical. Locals who could use a little help are invited to stop by the church Thursdays, year-round, from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. and pick up some food for their tables.

Those inspired by the quilting trio and St. Francis Xavier Church can show similar generosity without learning to quilt in record speed. Because really, who has the time to learn something new during the holidays? There’s eggnog to drink! There’s mistletoe to hang! There’s a new Dolly Parton Christmas movie on Netflix! To find giving opportunities, or as I like to call them, givtunities, look no further than Main Street.

Despite the insanity that has been 2020, the Angel Tree is alive and well at the Heron, 40 Main St. This program gives participants a name, interests and wishlist from a child whose family might not be able to add to Santa’s presents this year.

Shout out to Marla Puccetti for coordinating the tree each year.

Those missing the early December Angel Tree deadline still have options. Convenient toy donation stations can usually be found throughout Sullivan County. Hopefully, Covid Claus won’t prevent the U.S. Post Office at 75 Main St. from placing a collection barrel in the lobby as they have in years past. Very easy. Shop and drop. No donation too small, or too big. Your gift will be sent to a worthy home.

Otherwise, it’s over the river (reporter) and through the woods to another location. The horse knows the way! Surely, there’s somewhere on the way to Grandmother’s house accepting a donation or two for children in need.

After all, good fortune brought us to this community, and that kind of luck is meant to be shared. Happy holidays to all.

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