Cheese, stop wine-ing

Nothing says 'I have everything under control' like preparing a cheese board for your friends.

Posted 8/21/19

Here are some tips on cheese and wine pairings, and a few suggestions for where to grab your Swiss and sauvignon blanc locally.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Cheese, stop wine-ing

Nothing says 'I have everything under control' like preparing a cheese board for your friends.

Posted

Fall is approaching—that lovely time when you begin the gradual, and then all at once, retreat indoors. As we approach Labor Day, so too do we approach the demise of grilling season.

If you’re among the recently grown up, or know of someone who is—i.e. that special selection of years between 25 and 35 when you realize your parties now include food—you might be feeling a bit lost as you prepare to host grown-up gatherings. Luckily, the Upper Delaware is home to a slate of locally sourced cheese and wine shops. And nothing says “I have everything under control” like preparing a cheese board for your friends.

Here are some tips on cheese and wine pairings, and a few suggestions for where to grab your Swiss and sauvignon blanc locally.

- According to Wine Folly, cheese and wine should match in intensity. “Wines over 14.5% ABV are more intense and taste better with more intensely flavored cheeses. Wines under 12% ABV are less intense and match nicely with more delicately flavored cheeses.”

- Hard cheeses, including cheddar, comte, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Manchego are the easiest to pair, according to the ultimate online guide for wine and cheese pairing, www.matchingfoodandwine.com.

- Pair them with a medium-bodied red or, if you’re feeling frisky, try cheddar and chardonnay.

- Salty or funky cheeses, like blue or camembert, pair well with sweet wines.

Keep it simple: perfect pairings for commonly found products


Wine: Pinot grigio, Sauvignon blanc
Cheese: Goat cheese, feta, Monterray jack, mozzarella

Wine: Pinot noir, merlot
Cheese: Cheddar, dry Monterray jack, gouda, brie

Wine: Sherry (a before-dinner aperitif)
Cheese: Manchego, Parmigiano Reggiano (check out www.bit.ly/SherryTRR for Nora Singley’s recommendations on pairing different kinds of port)

Wine: Vintage port (an after-dinner digestif)
Cheese: Stilton, Roquefort, Gorgonzola, Fourme d’Ambert, well-aged cheddar

Get creative: perfect pairings for less commonly found products

The above suggestions are broad, and basic. They won’t steer you in the wrong direction, but they won’t impress a sommelier. If you’re looking to get a little more sophisticated, talk to locals who know best.

Wine Merchant in Callicoon, NY
Emminence Road Winery in Long Eddy, NY
Three Hammers Winery in Hawley, PA
Antler Ridge Winery in Honesdale, PA

Are you an expert in a specific food arena (perhaps you are a sommelier)? We’re always open for contributors to our food section. Email copyeditor@riverreporter.com.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment